FAQ

The three communities share a basic set of design principles and technological foundations — but the people, goals, and prospects are almost completely distinct.

Adding a new SSH key to your Werbot account

Adding a new SSH key to your Werbot account

Before adding a new SSH key to your Werbot account, you should have:

Checked for existing SSH keys
Generated a new SSH key

After adding a new SSH key to your Werbot account.

  1. Copy your public SSH key to the clipboard by using one of the commands below depending on your Operating System:
    macOS:
    pbcopy < ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub

    WSL / GNU/Linux (requires the xclip package):
    xclip -sel clip < ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub
  2. In the upper-right corner of any page, click your profile, then click Keys.

    Open Keys page in profile.
  3. Click New SSH key or Add SSH key

    Add Keys to profile.
  4. In the "Name" field, add a descriptive label for the new key. For example, if you're using a work Mac, you might call this key "Work Mac".
    Paste your key into the "SSH key content" field.

    Add SSH key to list.
  5. ClickSave key.

Checking for existing SSH keys

Checking for existing SSH keysChecking for existing SSH keys

  1. Open a terminal on Linux or macOS and enter next command to see if existing SSH keys are present:
  2. ls -al ~/.ssh
  3. Check the directory listing to see if you already have a public SSH key. By default, the filenames of the public keys are one of the following:
    id_rsa.pub
    id_ecdsa.pub
    id_ed25519.pub

If you don't have an existing public and private key pair, or don't wish to use any that are available to connect to Werbot, then generate a new SSH key.

If you see an existing public and private key pair listed (for example id_rsa.pub and id_rsa) that you would like to use to connect to Werbot, you can add your SSH key to Werbot account.


Generate a new SSH key pair

Generate a new SSH key pair

Before creating an SSH key pair, make sure to understand the different types of keys.
To create a new SSH key pair:

  1. Open a terminal on Linux or macOS
  2. Generate a new RSA SSH key pair:
    ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 4096 -C "email@example.com"
    Or, if you want to use ED25519:
    ssh-keygen -t ed25519 -C "email@example.com"
    he -C flag adds a comment in the key in case you have multiple of them and want to tell which is which. It is optional.
  3. Next, you will be prompted to input a file path to save your SSH key pair to. If you don’t already have an SSH key pair and aren’t generating a deploy key, use the suggested path by pressingEnter. Using the suggested path will normally allow your SSH client to automatically use the SSH key pair with no additional configuration. If you already have an SSH key pair with the suggested file path, you will need to input a new file path and declare what host this SSH key pair will be used for in your ~/.ssh/config file.
  4. Once the path is decided, you will be prompted to input a password to secure your new SSH key pair. It’s a best practice to use a password, but it’s not required and you can skip creating it by pressingEnter twice. If, in any case, you want to add or change the password of your SSH key pair, you can use the -p flag:
    ssh-keygen -p -f 

Create a new Company

Create a new Company

And while we worry and invent nightmares about killer machines,


Add a server

Add a server

And while we worry and invent nightmares about killer machines,


Add/Invite users to your Company

Add/Invite users to your Company

And while we worry and invent nightmares about killer machines,


Share server access with users

Share server access with users

And while we worry and invent nightmares about killer machines,


Add a key on server

Add a key on server

And while we worry and invent nightmares about killer machines,


Connect to server

Connect to server

And while we worry and invent nightmares about killer machines,